THE EARTH SUSTAINING SCIENCES INSTITUTE

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS THROUGH SCIENCE

S

SYMECULTURE

ecosocietally EFFICIENt intergenerationally SUSTAINABLE domestic and COMMERCIAL BIOGENIC SUPPORTED POLYCULTURE cultivation SYSTEMS 

PERHAPS BEST UNDERSTOOD AS A complete ECOSOCIETAL SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO Purely Natural Cultivation

Qualified through technical ability, guidance, practical experience and adherence to sound ethics, the SymECulture approach improves soils, crops, natural vegetation, ecological, economic, and societal circumstances.

 

SymECulture is an ecosocietal intergenerationally sustainable biogenic cultivation system of purely natural cultivation. SymECulture is the symbiotic rhizosphere sustaining of cultivating medium, biota and plant assisting in the developing of soil systems to advance ecologically sustainable less water and nutrition demanding permanence in agriculture as a purely natural cultivation methodology. Abiding technical structure, practical experience and adherence to sound ethics, the SymECulture approach supports and improves soils, crops, natural vegetation, ecological, economic, and societal circumstances.

 

The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute has over 20-years reviewed multiple cropping methodologies in multiple countries and climates to determine the most desired cultivation ideals. This led to the development of intergenerationally sustaining systems and process to facilitate continual improvement of soils, plants and associated ecologies. The approach is nothing new; many agriculturally efficient centres in the Middle East, South America and Papua New Guinea have practiced this style of cultivation for thousands of years. ESSI have simply perfected their version of it with a philosophy to advance the development and application of ecosocietally sustainable science-based micro, mezzo and macro cropping centred upon biologically and geochemically managed purely natural soils and cultivation mediums producing high-yield, high-value results to full practical realisation.

 

The outcome is the simpler delivery of crops, using less water and effort to achieve improved economics. The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute will now advance their scientific centrus and practical SymECulture cultivation to global domestic and commercial communities focused upon intergenerational, ecosocietal shared success advancement.

 

ESSI designed and developed the SymECulture methodology, which in 2019 following 8 months of cultivation trials was proven at the Tilligerry Permaculture Research and Education Farm, NSW, as a simple highly effective polyculture cropping process through the application of tailored biota-manifold assisted cultivating mediums, seamlessly coupled with multiple biostimulation variables. The methodology is anchored by tailored locally developed, fermented microbiota matured organic compost complexes, natural geochemical soil stabilisation processes, and natural microbiota fermented and matured minimal risk natural bionutrient enrichment and management processes.

 

Multi-disciplinary science application in beneficial design

The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute multidisciplinary sciences applications in agriculture and natural environment management through the integration of economic, high-yield intergenerationally sustainable polyculture systems. The processes appropriately synthesise multiple disciplines to reach rapidly deliverable solutions to both simple and complex soil and cultivation situations. In this case, the multidisciplinary science application refers to the research and knowledge determined set of flexible processes that synergistically equally beneficiate the commercial and natural environment for societal serving food production. The technically achieved solutions resulting in simply applied minimal tilling techniques comprise the progressive enhancement of naturally occurring biological processes and focus upon the minimum change for maximum benefit development of:

 

  1. Production techniques, (growing medium development, companion cropping, bioorganic fertigation),
  2. Natural improvements in crop quantity and quality,
  3. Minimised effects of pests on crops and natural systems cooperatively maximising soil and plant health and vitality,
  4. Transformation of natural primary product values,
  5. Reduced water use, nutrification, waste management and energy consumption
  6. Effective use of the various sciences relating to cultivation and agricultural resources and the environment, i.e. soil science, agroclimatology, biology of crops and animals (crop science, animal science and their included sciences, ruminant nutrition, animal welfare), economics, rural sociology and agricultural engineering,
  7. Balance between upstream and downstream terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and interface enhancement.

 

 Upstream outcomes

  • Preservation of natural systems, aquifer protection and surface water management delivering intergenerationally sustainable productivity.
  • Land design that ensures the agricultural applications encourage natural habitat and land forms enhancing biodiversity.
  • Water conscious functional design and application that ensures the effective management of natural resources and processes including the minimisation of groundwater use and the appropriate use and preservation of surface water.
  • Communities’ development of existing ecosystems and societal and cultural viability.

                                    

 Downstream outcomes

  • Enhancement of natural systems, aquifer protection and surface water management delivering intergenerationally sustainable productivity.
  • Land development of applications that provide for the enhancing of biodiversity in both natural habitat and agricultural land forms.
  • Water development of conscious functional design and application that ensures the effective management of natural resources and processes including the minimisation of groundwater use and the appropriate use and preservation of surface water.

Minimum Change for Maximum Benefit!

Simple Function - Complex Achievement - Shared Success

 

The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute Commercial SymECulture Systems are structured around minimum risk for maximum benefit solutions for land, water, agriculture and environmental assets management. The focus of the systems, is aligned to the principles of Permanent Agriculture, as without some form of permanent agriculture there is a risk intergenerational society, is to advance efficient and effective ecosocietal prosperity. The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute approach of tailored in-house solutions delivers cost effective, practical and intergenerationally sustainable agricultural and environmental rehabilitation solutions. 

                                                                 Non-SymECulture cultivation beds                                                                                                                       ESSI SymECulture cultivation beds

                                             Standard Poor Conditions Cultivation growth and productivity                                                       Same location with SymECulture Less water & less effort - higher quality and yield

 

Plant Growing Methodologies

The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute (ESSI) reviewed and developed multiple plant growing methodologies over the last 20 years. The purpose of this is to continually discover the most desired ideals for growing plants and the developing of sustaining systems and process to facilitate continual improvement of soil, plant and associated ecologies. Our hypothesis on a broad scale is that the continuation of gossip oriented opinions and belief patterns vs science based growing development and growing techniques systems centred upon biologically and geochemically managed organic soils and growing mediums will produce the best results. The advancing of centrus scientific knowledge in plant growing methods and extend this knowledge to the greater community. As a group, were interested in intergenerational ecosocietal shared success advancement. As a rule most who can diversify from gossip oriented opinions and belief patterns and improve practical over technical curiosity and delivery of science and outcomes based solutions will assist in the advancing of such a methodology contributing to forward and laterally sound discussions and practices delivering the advancing of intergenerationally sound, scientifically and sensibility proven methodologies.

 

Relevance

ESSI research agrees that there is ample information on the topic of plant cultivation and that the majority of the information available tends to share similar scientifically supported opinions. Our studies suggest that the focus should be the growing medium using a managed amount of nitrogen based fertiliser, because nitrogen used in excess amounts may inhibit the fruiting phase in plant life through eutrophication. (Eutrophication, is excessive richness of nutrients in water bodies frequently due to run-off most commonly of oversupplied nutrients, such as nitrogen or phosphorus, which leads to overgrowth of plants and algae in aquatic ecosystems. After such organisms die, bacterial degradation of their biomass results in oxygen consumption, progressing an anaerobic environment. An anaerobic environment is one characterized by the lack of free oxygen, in contrast with an aerobic environment that is rich in oxygen. Although oxygen-free, the anaerobic environment may possess atomic oxygen bound in nitrites, sulphites and nitrates), thereby creating the state of hypoxia). Global peer consultation and research delivered recommendations, which concurred with the ESSI position in using limited amounts of direct nitrogen in the nutrification; instead balancing nitrogen biologically.

Research has been completed on the importance of reduced amounts of water on a much larger scale in both sheet watering and cultivation pocket watering. ESSI advocates the testing of water and water application amounts on a weekly basis in order to determine and maintain combinations, which prove to be the most successful in the specific location, biological combinations and ecologies especially with both hydration and eutrophication management in mind. This will vary from farm area to farm area and even cultivation bed to cultivation bed including comparative symbiotic approaches to the immediate and multiple season weather patterns.

 

The SymECulture soil and plant bionutrification and hydration management approach when correctly, simply and scientifically applied, is easily expanded to the broad-acre application in the real world. Globally, we all have and will continue to rely upon farmer supplied food and artificial chemical systems and processes related to one of the biggest industries in the world that affects all farming. Many farmers use copious amounts of chemicals and additives on their soils, plants and crops. These chemicals and additives include herbicides, pesticides, soil and biological stabilisation mediums and fertilisers. Farmers use the chemicals and additives to boost crop production, more often than not to the detriment of the ecologies and environments. While farmers using these chemicals do produce high volume crops that benefit our economy, they are continually depressing the intergenerational ecologies and the greater biosphere.

 

The alternative wherever suitable, is to conduct commercial farming as close to natural farming as sustainably, commercially viable. Natural farming can be a commercially productive economic element of agriculture. Natural farmers do not as a rule use chemical fertilisers or pesticides on their soils and crops. For fertilisers, compost or manure is used as the primary base commodity and managed to suit the entire ecology. Instead of herbicides, weeds are utilised as beneficial elements, mulched out, removed by hand or managed by natural elixir methodologies. Instead of weakening the soil in, which they farm by using chemicals and other non-natural products, the soil is enriched by natural fertiliser and biological enhancement. This leads to long-term ecosocietally sustainable progressive farm production. It is nothing new. The world has simply and needlessly been convinced to over apply the mass monoculturalistic cropping mentality to most agriculture.

 

So which methodology is really most ideal?

Commercial farming supported chemical and other additives has been working economically successfully since 1867 (Germany). There is even generally a crops’ excess every year. It’s also true that commercial organic farming to date generally produces less, takes longer and is generally only appropriate if one is willing to sacrifice quality control and the immediate ecological and environmental safety for mass production. SymECulture now negates this position.

 

On an even larger scale, one could look at the global effects. Every year our planet becomes increasingly polluted. Should we continue over injecting our planet with even more harmful chemicals? Once rich and strong natural soil is now generally weakened! Modified by chemicals and other contaminants such as mining metals, sulphates and hydrocarbons with trees and forests are now increasingly retarded. Natural conservative approach farming nurtures soil, ecologies and the environment. When correctly and effectively committed to in factual functional approaches utilising sustainably measurable systems and processes it can also have a locally and globally effective remediating and rehabilitating and sustaining effect.

 

Materials and Methods

Tailored Growing Mediums

Overall ESSI promote the management of soil nutrition and hydration through the local development and use of tailored cultivation mediums, which are seamlessly symbiotically coupled with plant biostimulation variables. This is primarily anchored by fermented and matured tailored organic compost complexes, natural geochemical soil stabilisation processes, bionutrient enrichment and biological management processes. The growing mediums are be broken down into 5 groups:

  • Matured tailored bioorganic enhanced compost complexes,
  • Seed starting complexes,
  • Seedling advancing and transplanting complexes,
  • Matured structured soil enrichment complexes,
  • Matured tailored sustainable natural soil complexes.

 

Compost is a major component of rich soil conditioning mediums that add nutrients to the soil and plants and helps retention of soil moisture. They don’t call it “black gold” for nothing. When the appropriate mixture is bionutrified to advance the sustainable rhizosphere interrelationships and interactivity development process, it can be the absolute difference in symbiotic cultivation and crop achievement while maintaining the progressive integrity and longevity of the soil. The matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complexes symbioses’ is the single most important complement you can provide cultivation mediums and plants. Microscopic organisms matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complexes, break down organic materials for plant use, help aerate the soil, enable superior nutrient transfer and maintenance, and assist to ward off pests and plant disease. Composting can also divert as much as 30% of household waste to the immediate beneficial planting environment adding significant benefits, reducing cost and waste. All compostable materials are either carbon or nitrogen-based, to varying degrees. The secret to healthy matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complexes is to maintain a working balance between these two elements.

 

Healthy matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complexes should have much more carbon than nitrogen.

 

Carbon

Carbon-rich matter (like branches, stems, dried leaves, peels, shredded wood, bark dust or sawdust, shredded brown paper bags, corn stalks, coffee filters, coffee grounds, conifer needles, egg shells, straw, peat moss, wood ash) aids in providing compost its light, fluffy body.

 

 Nitrogen

Nitrogen or protein-rich matter (manures, food scraps, green lawn clippings, kitchen waste, and green leaves) provides raw materials for making enzymes.

 

A healthy matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complex should have much more carbon than nitrogen. A simple rule of thumb is to use one-third green and two-thirds brown materials. The bulkiness of the brown materials allows oxygen to penetrate and nourish the organisms that reside there. Too much nitrogen makes for a dense, smelly, slowly decomposing anaerobic mass. Be mindful of ammonia generation, if not corrected it will depending upon quality, be highly detrimental to the productivity of the mix and the end soils and growing results. Good composting hygiene means covering fresh nitrogen-rich material, which can release odours if exposed to open air, with carbon-rich material, which often exudes a fresh, wonderful smell. If in doubt, add more carbon! The smell of ammonia from a compost pile is an indicator that the pile has become anaerobic, and/or that there is too much nitrogen in the compost mixture. If the pile is outdoors and exposed to the weather, frequent rainfall saturating the pile may be to blame for anaerobic conditions and can be corrected by covering the pile. Another cause could be poor physical structure within the pile (high bulk density, low porosity) that limits oxygen diffusion towards the center.

This can be fixed by:

  • Correctly mixing a bulking agent into the pile, such as wood chips, to create larger pores to improve air and water movement,
  • More frequent mixing or 'turning' of the pile may replenish oxygen supplies and stimulate decomposition. Too much nitrogen in the pile can be corrected by mixing in some high-carbon, decomposable substrates like hay to stimulate microbial demand for nitrogen,
  • A more attuned methodology is to bionutrify the complex utilising stable pH managed biological nutrification mixes to enhance bacterial and biological colonisation and positive activity,
  • Finally, it is possible that the compost was not ‘mature’, not balanced in the first place or during development, not completely stabilised especially when not sampled or intelligently managed. Non empirical or scientifically considered complex validated opinions and unqualified ‘ideas’ are mostly just that. Guess work mostly fails planned acceptably proven function mostly succeeds. After the high-activity thermophilic stage is complete, there is residual ammonium in the compost that is eventually converted to nitrate as microbial energy supplies within the pile are depleted. Ammonia is an indicator that there is still energy in the pile and decomposition has not reached what is usually referred to as ‘maturity’. This can be corrected by simply letting the compost sit for a longer period of time, until decomposition has slowed. Compost stability and maturity measurement techniques can include carbon dioxide and ammonia production, heat generation, oxygen consumption, as well as testing the germination rate of plants. Adding a percentage of organic garden soil to your compost will help to mask odours, and endemic microorganisms in the soil will accelerate the composting process.

 

Seed Starting Mixes

The ESSI seed starting and advancing mixes when correctly structured and stabilised, nutrified and hydrated provide the highest success potential. It is essential to consider in any seed growing medium mix to understand the TRUE salinity of the mixture and the developmental needs of the seed. Seedling starting mix is usually a gritty mixture of soil particles, organic material and fine drainage components. 

Seed Starting Mix Recipe

  • All parts are measured by volume, so it doesn’t matter what you use to measure so long as it is consistent,
  • The seed starting mix must not be too high in nutrients, as this may harm delicate seedlings,
  • The starting mix should also hold onto moisture without becoming soggy. Overly wet conditions may rot seeds and encourage fungal outbreaks.

The seed starting mix should be an aerated light and fluffy structure to form a growing medium that avails strong seedlings growth:

  • Firstly, with two parts sieved matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complexes structured from managed low moisture, stable 6.5pH to 7pH as the base. The compost slowly releases nutrients into the mix, which assist to feed the seedlings as they grow,
  • Secondly, add one part steam sterilised sterile mushroom compost as a blend commodity. The compost adds nutrient and assists with aeration and moisture management,
  • Thirdly, add one part light, soft, fluffed paddock soil,

The three components should be folded together with a shovel to an even blend that mixed thoroughly with a garden fork,

  • Take your time and be thorough-you want a consistent mix, with all of the ingredients evenly distributed,
  • Once the mix is created, store in either a lidded container or in old compost sacks (or any other strong plastic sack) with the top rolled tightly and secured and store in a cool, dry place.

 

 Seedling Advancing Mixes

Whereas seedling raising mix is usually a gritty mixture of soil particles, organic material and fine drainage components; seedling advancing mix has a larger proportion of organic material. It holds onto more moisture and has higher nutrient levels to sustain developing young plants. To know what a good seedling advancing mix is, first you need to know what the purpose of a seedling advancing mix is.

 The main functions of a seeding advancing mix are:

  • To hold moisture and nutrients around the plant roots, acting as a reservoir for critical elements of life in your container garden and enabling their assistance in greater interaction between plant, biology and soil,
  • To provide enough air to enable growing roots to be able to suitably ‘breathe’ and not rot, especially in container planting situations. Most people don’t often consider this, but it is critical to have a good amount of aeration in the seedling advancing mix to support active growth plant roots have a hard time surviving,
  • To support your plant, providing anchorage for the roots. A soil mix needs to settle around the roots of your plant and help hold it in place, so that it doesn’t blow over from the first wind. However, it also needs to be light enough to allow water and air to always be present under the soil surface so the plant’s roots have a balanced environment to grow in.

 

 Seedling Advancing Mix Recipe

All parts are measured by volume, so consistency is key. The seedling advancing mix must not be too high in nutrients, which may harm seedlings. The seedling advancing mix should be an aerated light and fluffy structure to form a growing medium that avails strong seedlings growth:

  • Firstly, with two parts non-sieved ESSI Matured Compost Mix structured from low moisture (damp), stable 6.5pH to 7pH lightly bionutrified compost as the base. The compost slowly releases nutrients into the mix, which assist to feed the seedlings as they grow,
  • Secondly, add one part steam sterilised sterile mushroom compost and one half part shredded wood as a blend commodity. The compost adds nutrient and assists with aeration and moisture management and the shredded wood with biological colonisation and moisture management,
  • Thirdly, add one part light, soft, fluffed paddock soil,

 

The three components should be folded together with a shovel to an even blend that mixed thoroughly with a garden fork,

Take your time and be thorough-you want a consistent mix, with all of the ingredients evenly distributed. Once the mix is created, store in either a lidded container or in old compost sacks (or any other strong plastic sack) with the top rolled tightly and secured and store in a cool, dry place. Any number of different materials can be used to create the primary seedling raising & advancing mix complexes. Many gardeners use soil from their garden in their pots, some make their own compost versions and add this to their containers. Any of these things can be done successfully especially when to scientifically stable recipes. Making ESSI seedling raising & advancing mixes will cause the need to change the way you hydrate and nutrify the plants in order to get optimal results. There are multiple combinations that can be synergised into a seedling raising mix. There are simple biologically balanced symbiotically efficient blends of some basic items using strait forward methodologies that will deliver outcomes that surpass many others.

 

Basic Reasoning for Creating a Biologically Logisticised Seedling Raising and Advancing Mix

Seedling raising & advancing mixes used in containers should be of a light and fluffy structure developed through the correct mix composition and management. Nutrient may be added in the form of a ‘starter charge’ and/or slow release formulations. Adjusting of the nutrification practices is necessary accordingly. Seedling raising & advancing mixes may utilise moisture retaining treatments, watering patterns may need to be altered for a seedling raising mix containing such complexes. Shredded wood as an integral constituent of the seedling raising & advancing mixes act to improve moisture retention and biological nutrification colonisation, and deliver more air space. By itself shredded wood does not provide enough of anything to really support plant life (except for possibly orchids in specialty mixes), but it is an excellent colonisation host for beneficial biological combination models. Once saturated with biological complexes it adds a new dimension and helps extend the ‘life’ of the seedling raising & advancing mixes by being relatively slow to break down while improving the multiplying of a multitude of beneficial biology. Steam sterilised mushroom compost is put into seedling raising mix to provide additional air space and to lighten the seedling raising & advancing mixes and add beneficial nutrient levels and assist in their management.

 

To summarize: seedling raising & advancing mixes provide a growing medium with stable pH, nutrient balance moisture retention and nutrient application.

 

Matured Structured Soil Enrichment Complexes

Soil enrichment methods refer to the various methods used to improve the quality (structure, nutrients’ content & organisms’ activities) of soil. The basic types are the organic and inorganic methods. In terms of biodiversity promotion (diverse organisms, diverse soil nutrients & conducive environment for organisms’ interaction), it is proven preference to consider the organic methods perform better than the inorganic and since our major aim is to promote biodiversity, we will only discuss some preferred organic methods. Many consider that soil is not much to look at but when it comes to growing healthy plants there’s nothing more important than a health, nutritious, hydration balanced growing medium. Ideally conditioned soil is one of the primary secrets behind successful growing and harvests. Biologically and biochemically balanced organic matter and biosolutions are more often than not the plantings cure-all, no matter what the soil type. It will lighten and improve drainage in heavy clay soils, and help both moisture and nutrients retention in sandy soils.

 

Basic Organic Matter Growing Bed Enrichment

Organic matter is simply decomposed plant or animal matter-for instance, garden compost, animal manure or leaf mould. Biological matter is considered as bacteria and biochemical matter is considered beneficial natural compounds, without man made or detrimental natural chemical effects, therefore considered supportive of organic functional approaches. When added to your soil, organic, biological and biochemical matter will improve its structure and feed or support the essential microbial life within. Compost and animal manure are naturally packed full of nutrients, bacteria and other organisms that when correctly matured and fermented in solution can dramatically increase the fertility and the long-term validity of the soil, and the growth rates and performance of plants. 

 

To incorporate organic matter into your pre-planting soil bed:

  • Firstly, lay the organic matter on the soil surface. Be as generous as you can without over doing the volume compared to the depth you wish to structure. Spread it evenly before rotary hoeing the material or forking the material into the top 150-300mm of the soil,
  • Secondly, inoculate the organic material enhanced soil bed with a bioorganic nutrient enrichment solution, usually 1 litre/m2 as described in the next section (Nutrient Enrichment),
  • Thirdly, cover the inoculated organically enriched soil bed,
  • Fourthly, inoculate the organic material enhanced soil bed with a bioorganic nutrient enrichment solution, usually 1 litre/m2 as described in the next section (Nutrient Enrichment),
  • Fifthly, when planting into the bed, excavate a planting pocket approximately 100-150mm in diameter and fill with seedling advancing mix to allow the plantings to stabilise and graduate to the growing bed nutrification accordingly.

 

New Cultivation Bed Growing Medium Development and Existing Bed Enhancement Complexes

The quality of cultivation medium (growing soil as it were) for ground beds in the ESSI system is based upon similar process as previously discussed. No specific combination of ingredients will make the perfect all around growing medium. What you put into your growing medium depends very much upon the background or baseline chemistry, tolerances, the planned plantings and the local climate, and prevailing weather conditions. Various plants require different acidity levels (pH). For example, blueberries need a more acidic growing medium. In answer to this the ESSI matured tailored bionutrified organic compost complexes’ processes are usually structured to from 6 pH through to 8.5 pH and can be managed biologically anywhere between, below and above to the required state and variance. Additionally, the processes assist to gear the growing medium texture toward your local weather conditions. For example if you live in a very arid and dry climate, you will want a growing medium that will retain moisture with good capillary action. One good method to start building out fertile soil begins with making a 50-50 mix of high quality compost and adequate soil with an acceptable chemistry position to develop the sustaining growing medium. The ESSI SABR (Symbiotic Aquatic BioReactor) process to attune the soil and growing medium pH to within the desired parameters. This involves the brewing and fermenting of the desired beneficial local biota to colonise and beneficiate the growing medium and the soil deposit. This is augmented by the in-tilling of carbon and colonisation mediums such a shredded wood and ploughed-in leguminous material. The process may appear to some like a burdensome set of technicalities, however, it is quite simple, only requiring discipline and the embracing of positive creative, and science supported change. The biological science has been completed by the ESSI over the last 20-years and all that is now necessary is some basic growing medium, soil and water chemistry measurements and the development of the biological process (liquor based solutions and biological columns, manifolds and colonies) through the correct local commodity based recipes and maturation methodologies. When one blends the compost and screened topsoil together thoroughly, a basic improved or enriched basic growing medium or soil mixture which you are able to further amend to suit specific needs.

 

Seedling Planting & Transplanting Garden Bed Growing Medium Mixes Recipe

All parts are measured by volume, so it doesn’t matter what you use to measure your ingredients, so long as you’re consistent.

The seedling planting garden bed growing medium mixes must be inoculated prior to stabilise and nutrify the soil and growing medium prior to planting to allow the plants into a symbiotic medium managed so as not to over nutrify the plantings,

The seedling advancing mix should be an aerated light and fluffy structure to form a growing medium that avails strong seedlings growth.

  • Firstly, with two parts non-sieved ESSI Matured Compost Mix structured from low moisture (damp), stable 6.5 pH to 7 pH lightly bionutrified compost as the base. The compost slowly releases nutrients into the mix, which assist to feed the seedlings as they grow.
  • Secondly, add one part steam sterilised sterile mushroom compost and one half part shredded wood as a blend commodity. The compost adds nutrient and assists with aeration and moisture management and the shredded wood with biological colonisation and moisture management.
  • Thirdly, add one part light, soft, fluffed paddock soil. The three components should be folded together with a shovel to an even blend that mixed thoroughly with a garden fork,
  • Take your time and be thorough-you want a consistent mix, with all of the ingredients evenly distributed. Once the mix is created, store in either a lidded container or in old compost sacks (or any other strong plastic sack) with the top rolled tightly and secured and store in a cool, dry place.

 

Nutrition Mixes

The nutrition mediums are be broken down into 5 groups.

  • ESSI BioStim Complex
  • ESSI BioGrow Complex
  • ESSI BioFert Complex
  • ESSI High Nutrient Elixir Simplex
  • ESSI High Nutrient Elixir Complex

 

Distinguishing Natural Biostimulants from Artificial or Chemical Crop Advancement Inputs

The ESSI Symbiotic Bionutrification System activates soil and plant biology delivering sustainable, highly productive advancements. Natural Biostimulants differ from commercial fertilisers, regardless of the presence of nutrients in the products. They differ from other crop protection products by acting on the plant’s vigour while supporting direct actions against pests and disease. Natural Crop Biostimulation complements to crop nutrition, crop advancement, harvest improvement and ecological support. Plant biostimulants stimulate natural processes to benefit nutrient uptake, nutrient efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance and crop quality. Smart Growth develops an economy based on practiced knowledge and innovation for a societally prosperous bio-based economy. Sustainable growth promotes a continually improving resources efficient, greener and competitive economy while Inclusive growth fosters an improved employment, business generation and advancing productivity economy delivering local, national and regional cohesion. Improving nutrient uptake efficiency induces superior quality and yield, facilitating nutrient assimilation, translocation and use increasing plant tolerance to and recovery from abiotic stresses. Enhancing quality attributes of produce, including carbon and cellulose content, colour, fruit seeding advances sustainability rendering more efficient water use and enhancing soil fertility by fostering development of complementary microorganisms.

 

ESSI BioStim Complex

The BioStim Complex, is a highly economic regenerable biological bionutrification general growth stimulation solution liquor created from complex bioorganics. A natural soil and plant biostimulant containing micro-organisms whose function when applied to soils and the rhizosphere (the region of soil in the vicinity of plant roots in which the chemistry and microbiology is influenced by their growth, respiration, and nutrient exchange) is to stimulate natural processes to enhance/benefit nutrient uptake efficiency, crop quality, and the plant’s tolerance of abiotic stress. Natural biostimulants are a critical ingredient in sustainability and can dramatically reduce the use of ecologically oppressing chemical enhancement and fertilisation. Plant biostimulants contain substance(s) or micro-organisms whose function when applied to plants or the rhizosphere is to stimulate natural processes to enhance/benefit nutrient uptake, efficiency, and tolerance to abiotic stress, and crop quality.

 

Natural biostimulants are a critical ingredient in sustainability and can dramatically reduce the use of ecologically oppressing chemical enhancement and fertilisation.

 

ESSI BioGrow Complex

BioGrow Complex, is a highly economic regenerable general high-powered biological bionutrification growth accelerating phytonutrient system equally useful for crops and rehabilitation plantings in all conditions. Differing from BioStim, a primary general bionutrification process, BioGrow, is used to nutrify very poor or depleted soils and inoculate growing mediums. BioGrow is a natural phytonutrient accelerating growth system for small acre to broad acre crops and rehabilitation plantings, including dry or water-soak plantings. The system can also be blended with a permeable, soils and particulates binder and stabilizer (BioBindActive) and can be applied at concentration and saturation rates tailored to the receiving medium and plant requirements. The solution binds the soil assisting in erosion and evaporation reduction, allowing to-soil permeation through the bound surface, maintaining the light seal reducing from-soil evaporation when dry. BioGrow can also be blended with BioSeal to assist in soil and surfaces management. The process sustainably improves the growth of crops and rehabilitation plantings in dry to water soak areas.

 

High Nutrient Elixir Simplex

High Nutrient Elixir Simplex is a highly economic regenerable distillation of minimal risk specialised fungal mediums to develop an exceptionally highly nutrifying Inoculation elixir.

 

ESSI BioFert Complex

BioFert Complex, is a highly economic regenerable general bioorganic bionutrification growth maintenance phytonutrient system equally useful for crops and rehabilitation plantings in all conditions. Differing from BioGrow and BioStim, primary general biological process, BioFert, is used to maintain nutrification of beds, plants and crops following BioStim and BioGrow inoculation, and developmental support of growing mediums and plants

 

ESSI High Nutrient Elixir Complex

High Nutrient Elixir Complex is a liquor created by correct-balance blending High Nutrient Elixir Simplex with BioStim,   which is becomes a balanced bionutrification and wetting assistance solution.

Arid and High Salinity Lands Viable Agriculture Enhancement and Management

Arid and high salinity lands viable agriculture enhancement and management has demonstrated long-term agricultural land, all-natural biological water and soil salinity management followed by commercial level biologically sustained small acre to broad acre polyculture agricultural advancements. The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute teaching and training programs to advance local and international economic, ecological and food security abilities focuses are:

 

Water desalination

  • Water retention and reuse within the landscape,
  • Soil desalination, stabilisation, nutrification and water retention,
  • Restoration of appropriate levels of ecologically stable native growth and the further development of commercial cropping that advances and supports natural processes,
  • Diversified land use enabling the maximizing of sustainable ecological, economic and regenerative benefits.

 

The issues

Beneath the soils of many global centres in significant need of food and fodder production development and environmental stabilisation are often salt stores so immense, and the movement of sub-surface water so slow, that the restoration to fertility of salt-affected land forecast to take generations is ignored as too difficult. It is claimed that in some areas even if the replanting of up to 80% of the native vegetation, some areas would not see recovery within normal human timescales. It is a tragic irony that the felling of many billions of trees to make room for monoculture farming that let Australia prosper in just 150-years has become one of the worst environmental crises, and destroyed a natural balance that existed for millennia. Now, farmers are fearful as they watch their intergenerational livelihoods degrade and the economy suffer multiple billion dollar losses.

 

Water issues

Water is a fundamental element of the global economy. Generally in areas without healthy water resources or agriculture, societally wide economic growth is restricted or difficult to sustain. Without access to clean water, nearly every industry suffers most notably, agriculture. As clean or fresh, unpolluted water scarcity grows as a global concern, food security is also brought into consideration. A major issue for agriculture is the increasing salinity of soils and water brought about by excessive clearing, geological structure and over extraction of ground and surface water without adequate replenishment. Agricultural water, is water committed for use in the production of food and fibre. On average, 80 percent of fresh water drawn from surface and groundwater is used to produce food and other agricultural products.  With modern advancements, crops are being cultivated year round in countries all around the world. As water usage becomes a more pervasive global issue, irrigation practices for crops are being refined and becoming more sustainable. While there are a variety of irrigation systems, these may be grouped as: high flow and low flow and must be managed precisely to prevent runoff, over spray, or low-head drainage 50-years ago, the common perception was that water was an infinite resource. At this time, there were fewer than half the current number of people on the planet. Affluence was not as high, individuals consumed fewer calories and ate less meat, so less water was needed to produce their food. They required a third of the volume of water we presently take from rivers. Today, the competition for water resources has increased in intensity. This is because there are now close to eight billion people on the planet, their consumption cereals, meat and vegetables is rising. To avoid a global water crisis farmers will have to find ways to more effectively find, manage and utilize water to increase productivity to meet growing demands for food, while industry and cities also find ways to use water more efficiently. Successful agriculture is dependent upon farmers having sufficient access to water. However, water scarcity is already a critical constraint to farming in many parts of the world. Arid regions frequently suffer from water scarcity. It also occurs where water seems abundant but where resources are over committed. This can occur where there is over development of hydraulic infrastructure, usually for irrigation.  The adage of water, water everywhere but not a drop to drink can be applied here as plenty of water but too much salt.

 

Water solutions

ESSI has created the first all-natural, economic, environmentally and societally sustainable all-natural water desalination process. We advanced the Symbiotic Aquatic BioReactor (SABR) processes, to date highly successful in managing pH and stripping metals and metalloid contaminants from mining and industrial water in conditions displaying 0.5 pH to 14 pH, to biologically remove salinity (biodesalination) delivering economic, sustainable freshwater and arable soils. The ESSI Symbiotic Aquatic BioReactor Bioorganic Desalination Solution (SABRBODS) process, was perfected following more than 25 years of development. The result being an effective, affordable complete set of solutions in all-natural water and soils desalination, and synthesizes with the bioorganic nutrification, wetting, binding and surface stabilisation of soils in a single agricultural SABRSoil-Lifecycle system. The ESSI has delivered solutions in seawater reducing salinity from 35000 ppm to below 2000 ppm and salt lake and agricultural soils and water from 27000 ppm to less than 50 ppm in extended research and development demonstrating the SABR process’ ability to overcome any challenge thus far exhibited.

 

The SABRBODS process is a unique combination of naturally occurring, localized, cooperative bioorganisms formed into manifolds or SABR Symbiotic Colonies (SABR-SC). Thus far, 360 different Sabra's have been developed and proven in a wide range of conditions. It delivers commercially viable management solutions and is a societally sustainable management solution to challenging effluent and contamination, especially in agriculture. The SABRBODS process, passive, local taxon structured water and soil treatment systems have thus-far successfully remediated all globally presented soil and water challenges with the demonstrated ability to raise the pH to 8.7 pH (up to 9 pH) or reduce it from 14 pH to 6.1 pH balancing the realized effluent to neutral, stripping up to 99% of bioavailable metals and metalloid contaminants and significantly reducing salinity (now up to more than 95%).

The approach is to utilize the SABR and SABRBODS processes, in ecosystem-friendly bioremediation, desalination of seawater and saline ground and surface water and the re-invigoration of soils at commercial levels making them available for sustainable agricultural use. The SABR and SABRBODS processes reduce natural and agricultural environment loss through salinity and the growing intergenerational societal risks that water and soil contamination present.

 

Soil solutions

ESSI has created an all-natural, economic, environmentally and societally sustainable Agricultural Soil Lifecycle process (SABR-SLP). The process is a culmination of the Symbiotic Aquatic BioReactor (SABR) Acid Mine Drainage, Alkaline, Red Mud and associated effluents management and the biodesalination processes, coupled with our all natural enhancement and advancement processes and systems. The result is a highly effective, affordable complete set of all-natural solutions in agricultural soil treatment and support delivering metals and metalloid contamination, desalination, bioorganic nutrification, wetting, binding and surface stabilisation and sealing in a single process. The SABR bionutrification process provides soil carbon and stimulates biological activity and growth support while the binding and wetting processes improve the containment and carrying abilities and coupled with the sealing process reducing evaporation and erosion while allowing precipitation influx. The SABR-Soil Lifecycle System (SABR-SLS) is a combination of microbiological supplemented organic carbon improving elements, irrigated or sprayed in volumes calculated according soil and crop needs. The ESSI approach is to utilise the SABR-SLS, in ecosystem stable bioremediation and reinvigoration of soils at sustainable commercial agriculture levels. The ESSI SABR and SABRBODS processes reduce agricultural and natural environment loss through salinity and the growing intergenerational water, soil and societal risks that high level chemically supported agriculture, industrial, mining and natural contamination present.

 

The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute Symbiotic Cultivation Systems

The ESSI SymECulture Symbiotic Cultivation System naturally enhances and activates soil and plant biology delivering a sustainable, highly productive multiple focus organically derived program.

 

Distinguishing natural biostimulants from artificial or chemical crop advancement inputs

The Symbiotic Growth System activates soil and plant biology delivering sustainable, highly productive advancements.

  • Natural Biostimulants differ from commercial fertilisers, regardless of the presence of nutrients in the products.
  • Natural Biostimulants differ from crop protection products acting on the plant’s vigour while supporting direct actions against pests and disease.
  • Natural Crop Biostimulation complements to crop nutrition, crop advancement, harvest improvement and ecological support.
  • Plant biostimulants stimulate natural processes to benefit nutrient uptake, nutrient efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance and crop quality.
  • Smart Growth develops an economy based on practiced knowledge and innovation for a societally prosperous bio-based economy.
  • Sustainable Growth promotes a continually improving resources efficient, greener and competitive economy.
  • Inclusive Growth fosters an improved employment, business generation and advancing productivity economy delivering local, national and regional cohesion.
  • Improving nutrient uptake efficiency induces superior quality and yield.
  • Facilitating nutrient assimilation, translocation and use. 
  • Increasing plant tolerance to and recovery from abiotic stresses.
  • Enhancing quality attributes of produce, including carbon and cellulose content, colour, fruit seeding advances sustainability. 
  • Rendering more efficient water use. 
  • Enhancing soil fertility by fostering development of complementary microorganisms

Sustainable Economic Natural Cultivation Enhancement and Biofertigation for High Yield, High Quality Crops


THE EARTH SUSTAINING SCIENCES INSTITUTE SYMBIOTIC CULTIVATION  SYSTEMS

The ESSI Symbiotic Cultivation System naturally enhances and activates soil and plant biology delivering a sustainable, highly productive multiple focus organically derived program.

DISTINGUISHING NATURAL BIOSTIMULANTS FROM ARTIFICIAL OR CHEMICAL CROP ADVANCEMENT INPUTS

  • The Symbiotic Growth System activates soil and plant biology delivering sustainable, highly productive advancements.

  • Natural Biostimulants differ from commercial fertilisers, regardless of the presence of nutrients in the products.

  • Natural Biostimulants differ from crop protection products acting on the plant’s vigour while supporting direct actions against pests and disease.

  • Natural Crop Biostimulation complements to crop nutrition, crop advancement, harvest improvement and ecological support.

  • Plant biostimulants stimulate natural processes to benefit nutrient uptake, nutrient efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance and crop quality.

  • Smart Growth develops an economy based on practiced knowledge and innovation for a societally prosperous bio-based economy.

  • Sustainable Growth promotes a continually improving resources efficient, greener and competitive economy.

  • Inclusive Growth fosters an improved employment, business generation and advancing productivity economy delivering local, national and regional cohesion.

  • Improving nutrient uptake efficiency induces superior quality and yield.

  • Facilitating nutrient assimilation, translocation and use. 

  • Increasing plant tolerance to and recovery from abiotic stresses.

  • Enhancing quality attributes of produce, including carbon and cellulose content, colour, fruit seeding advances sustainability. 

  • Rendering more efficient water use. 

  • Enhancing soil fertility by fostering development of complementary microorganisms.

THE SABR PROCESS

The Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute design and deliver intergenerationally viable environmentally sustainable all-natural solutions for the mining, resources and agricultural industries, equally understanding the requisites and methodologies for functional advancement in business, culturally endorsed societal serving enterprise and environmental and ecological advancement. The culmination of 26+ years of research and development has delivered unprecedented solutions and processes which required world travels and demonstrations to allow those who could not grasp the functions of the SABR process to see the deliverables first hand. 

ESSI are the developers of the Symbiotic Aquatic BioReactor process (SABR), the world’s only proven all-natural, economically, environmentally viable solution for process affected 0-14 pH water and soil remediation and rehabilitation that additionally provides cost effective organic fertigation. The process solves previously thought untreatable contamination issues, allowing their conversion into viable alternatives. SABR is effective in remediating to usability, areas affected by metals, metalloids and pH imbalances resulting from mining, processing, agriculture and natural events. Our agricultural advancement systems yield extremely effective, all-natural, low risk, growth enhancement tuneable and scalable for most soils, crops and climes. We are also in the advanced stages of delivering an all-natural, low cost, SABR based complete desalination process (SABRBODS).  

We understand that one of the greatest business risks to the future of agriculture, mining, and industry is the evolution of environmental guidelines forced upon commercial entities (including farmers), governments and the private sector by contemporary society. While governments and society supported mass clearing of lands to advance agriculture, they now see fit to blame farmers for much of the salinity problems. To quote a Western Australia Wheatbelt NRM CEO, "We don't want solutions to salinity, the farmers need to adapt." This from a government allied and funded agency! The greater population is now realising with rapidly expanding understanding that many governments who  deliver lamentable laws and governance support politically correct often agenda serving protagonists which disregard respect, rights and recognition of the land, environment and affected parties, continuing to place accountability for government and bureaucratic sponsored ecosocietal degradation at the feet of the private mining, industrial and agriculture entities. Conversely, mining, industrial and agriculture entities, expertly return accountability firmly to the feet of the governments that deliver lamentable laws and governance, thereby maintaining the adamantine cycle. There is the continuing claim that required environmental remediation and rehabilitation of mining, industrial and agricultural activities is not cost efficient, although most, when promoting activity for approval, claim it is, and that it will be carried out; generally to revert to excuses when required to act, and sacrificing generally inadequate negotiated environmental security bonds rather than deliver profit affecting solutions. The SABR process has successfully proven in every globally  attended challenge that such effective management, remediation and rehabilitation is now cost effective and intergenerationally sustainable; deliverable by local persons and groups, when trained and supported through the Earth Sustaining Sciences Institute.

SymECulture

Symbiotic Ecological Permanence in agriculture

 Purely Natural Inspired Intuitive Cultivation Methodology

MORE THAN ITS ARTISTIC, SCIENTIFIC OR TECHNICAL WORKS, THE GREATEST HUMAN ACHIEVEMENT IS THE RECOGNITION OF ITS OWN DYSFUNCTION.                 

                                                        It is time to embrace realities and deliver actual solutions                                                          

                                                                        

SymECulture on a water distressed farm - delivering cultivation with minimal water availability and SymECulture soil, nutrition and water management

sym-e-culture - Symbiotic ecological PERMANENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

ecosocietally EFFICIENt intergenerationally SUSTAINABLE domestic and COMMERCIAL BIOGENIC SUPPORTED POLYCULTURE cultivation SYSTEMS 

PERHAPS BEST UNDERSTOOD AS A complete ECOSOCIETAL SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO PURELY natural cultivation

When correctly and effectively committed-to in factual and functional approaches utilising sustainably measurable systems and processes the bioorganic and conservative SymECulture approach will also have an effective sustaining remediating and rehabilitating effect.

“The simple functional achievement of beneficial symbiotic relationships of living organisms’ with their physical surroundings in the sustainable advancement of permanence in agriculture.” Sampey 2020

History

Permaculture - The Realities

In 1929, Joseph Russell Smith created an antecedent term as the subtitle for Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture, a book which sums up his long experience experimenting with fruits and nuts as crops for human food and animal feed. Smith saw the world as an inter-related whole and suggested mixed systems of trees and crops underneath. This book inspired many individuals intent on making agriculture more sustainable, such as Toyohiko Kagawa who pioneered forest farming in Japan in the 1930s.

The best definition of Permaculture or permanent agriculture and permanent culture is “One that can be sustained indefinitely!”

Several have modified, revolutionized, advanced and/or manipulated the practice of permaculture design, but few have revolutionised Permaculture!

Most practitioners are so busy with demonstrating gardens and personal interactions with Permaculture that they drift passed the true concept that Permaculture or permanent agriculture and permanent culture is “one that can be sustained indefinitely!” The fail in the delivery of the ‘Permanence’ and believe they are true and efficient ‘Permaculturalists and Permaculture ‘Practitioners’ if they simply follow the Permaculture principles in their own way without achieving effective sustainable outcomes. Permaculture or permanent agriculture and permanent culture “one that can be sustained indefinitely!”  is not simple a set of design principles centered on whole systems thinking, simulating, or directly utilising the patterns and resilient features observed in natural ecosystems without sustainable practice and outcomes. It uses these principles in a growing number of fields from regenerative agriculture, re-wilding, and community resilience. These are the Principles of Permaculture – The means by which to effectively design Permanence in Agriculture in any given application. We may therefore consider that most Permaculturalists or Permaculture Practitioners are Permaculture Designer who are yet to incorporate the ability to maintain Permaculture or Permanence in Agriculture. To simple blame the fact that it does not rain and the crops die or seeds wont germinate because the growing mediums and soils are incompetent is NOT Permanence in Agriculture. Design does not deliver solutions…it is simply an inclusive stage incorporating organised and functional methodologies, potentially achieving a more suitable result.

Permaculture

The actual term permaculture was coined by David Holmgren, then a graduate student at the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education's Department of Environmental Design, and Bill Mollison, senior lecturer in Environmental Psychology at University of Tasmania, in 1978. It originally meant "permanent agriculture", but was expanded to stand also for "permanent culture", since social aspects were integral to a truly sustainable system as inspired by Masanobu Fukuoka's natural farming philosophy. It has many branches including ecological design, ecological engineering, regenerative design, environmental design, and construction. Permaculture also includes integrated water resources management that develops sustainable architecture, and regenerative and self-maintained habitat and agricultural systems modelled from natural ecosystems.

The twelve principles of permaculture most commonly referred to were first described by David Holmgren in his book Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability (2002). They include Observe and Interact, Catch and Store Energy, Obtain a Yield, Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback, Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services, Produce No Waste, Design From Patterns to Details, Integrate Rather Than Segregate, Use Small and Slow Solutions, Use and Value Diversity, Use Edges and Value the Marginal, and Creatively Use and Respond to Change.

In Australian P. A. Yeomans' 1964 book Water for Every Farm, he supports the definition of permanent agriculture, as one that can be sustained indefinitely. Yeomans introduced both an observation-based approach to land use in Australia in the 1940s and the Keyline Design as a way of managing the supply and distribution of water in the 1950s.

Holmgren noted Stewart Brand's works as an early influence to permaculture. Other early influences include Ruth Stout and Esther Deans, who pioneered no-dig gardening, and Masanobu Fukuoka who, in the late 1930s in Japan, began advocating no-till orchards and gardens and natural farming.

Bill Mollison, "father of permaculture"

Bill Mollison (father of Permaculture) said:

"Permaculture is a philosophy of working with, rather than against nature; of protracted and thoughtful observation rather than protracted and thoughtless labour; and of looking at plants and animals in all their functions, rather than treating any area as a single product system."

In the late 1960s, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren started developing ideas about stable agricultural systems on the southern Australian island state of Tasmania. Dangers of the rapidly growing use of industrial-agricultural methods sparked these ideas. In their view, these methods were highly dependent on non-renewable resources, and were additionally poisoning land and water, reducing biodiversity, and removing billions of tons of topsoil from previously fertile landscapes. They responded with a design approach called permaculture. This term was first made public with their publication of their 1978 book Permaculture One.

Among some of the more recognizable names who received their original training within Mollison's Permaculture Design Course system would include Geoff Lawton and Toby Hemenway, each of whom have more than 25 years’ experience teaching and promoting permaculture as a sustainable way of growing food and providing for human needs. Simon J. Fjell was a Founding Director of the Permaculture Institute in late 1979 and a teacher of the first Permaculture Design Course, having first met Mollison in 1976. He has since worked internationally.

By the early 1980s, the concept had broadened from agricultural systems design towards sustainable human habitats. After Permaculture One, Mollison further refined and developed the ideas by designing hundreds of permaculture sites and writing more detailed books, such as Permaculture: A Designers Manual. Mollison lectured in over 80 countries and taught his two-week Permaculture Design Course to hundreds of students. Mollison "encouraged graduates to become teachers themselves and set up their own institutes and demonstration sites. This multiplier effect was critical to permaculture's rapid expansion." However, some critics suggest that this success came at the cost of effectively weakening permaculture's early social aspirations of moving away from an industrial form of society. They argue that the self-help model of permaculture instruction has had the effect in the west, of organizing students into the sort of market-focused individualistic sets of social relationships permaculture initially opposed. The focus became delivering the Design principle with little application of the science required to develop true permanence in agriculture – the original ethos.

The permaculture movement also spread throughout Asia and Central America, with Hong Kong-based Asian Institute of Sustainable Architecture (AISA), Rony Lec leading the foundation of the Mesoamerican Permaculture Institute (IMAP) in Guatemala and Juan Rojas co-founding the Permaculture Institute of El Salvador.


SymECulture - Symbiotic Ecological Permanence in Agriculture

“The simple functional achievement of beneficial symbiotic relationships of living organisms’ with their physical surroundings in the sustainable advancement of permanence in agriculture.” Sampey 2020.

In more than 20 years' of witnessing Permaculture practitioners and practices in many countries it became highly apparent that most practitioners are so busy with demonstrating gardens and personal interactions with Permaculture that they drift passed the true concept that Permaculture or permanent agriculture and permanent culture is “one that can be sustained indefinitely!” They often fail in the delivery of the ‘Permanence’ and believe they are true and efficient ‘Permaculturalists and Permaculture ‘Practitioners’ if they simply follow the Permaculture principles in their own way without achieving effective sustainable outcomes. Permaculture or permanent agriculture and permanent culture “one that can be sustained indefinitely!”  is is more than a simple a set of design principles centered on whole systems thinking, simulating, or directly utilising the patterns and resilient features observed in natural ecosystems without sustainable practice and outcomes. It uses these principles in a growing number of fields from regenerative agriculture, rewilding, and community resilience. These are the Principles of Permaculture –the means by which to effectively design Permanence in Agriculture in any given application. We may therefore consider that most Permaculturalists or Permaculture Practitioners are Permaculture Designers who are yet to incorporate the ability to maintain Permaculture or Permanence in Agriculture. To simply blame the fact that it does not rain and the crops die or seeds wont germinate because the growing mediums and soils are incompetent is NOT Permanence in Agriculture. Design does not deliver solutions…it is simply an inclusive stage incorporating organised and functional methodologies, potentially achieving a more suitable result.



The Comparative Permaculture – SymECulture Principles

 12 Permaculture Principles                         12 SymECulture Principles

                                                                                         1.     Observe and interact                                                                        1.  Effectively observe, design and interact

                                                                                         2.     Catch and store energy                                                                     2.  Manage sustainable energy

                                                                                         3.     Obtain a yield, apply self-regulation                                               3.  Advance sustainable yields

                                                                                         4.     Accept feedback                                                                               4.  Synergise valuable feedback

                                                                                         5.     Use and value renewable resources and services                             5.  Use sustainable resources and practices

                                                                                         6.    Produce no waste                                                                              6.  Manage and utilise all waste

                                                                                         7.    Design from patterns to details                                                         7.  Actual sustainability in design

                                                                                         8.    Integrate rather than segregate, use small and slow solutions         8.  Sustainably synergise all practices

                                                                                         9.    Use and value diversity                                                                      9.  Effectively manage diversity

                                                                                       10.    Use edges and value the marginal                                                   10.  Effectively utilise all cropping areas

                                                                                       11.    Creatively use                                                                                   11.  Effectively incorporate and manage use

                                                                                       12.    Respond to change                                                                           12.  Respond using sustainable positive change management